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IMAGE QUIZ
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 49-50

Trivial head injury or not?


1 Department of Neurosurgery, King Fahad University Hospital, University of Dammam, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
2 Department of Neurosurgery, King Fahad University Hospital, University of Dammam, Dammam, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Radiology, King Fahad University Hospital, University of Dammam, Dammam, Saudi Arabia

Date of Web Publication2-Dec-2015

Correspondence Address:
Hosam Al-Jehani
C/O Ms. Janice D. Liwanag, Department of Neurosurgery, King Fahd Hospital of the University, Building 4, 3rd Floor, Al-Khobar

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DOI: 10.4103/1658-631X.170915

PMID: 30787699

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How to cite this article:
Al-Jehani H, Al-Moathen Y, Alsaif H. Trivial head injury or not?. Saudi J Med Med Sci 2016;4:49-50

How to cite this URL:
Al-Jehani H, Al-Moathen Y, Alsaif H. Trivial head injury or not?. Saudi J Med Med Sci [serial online] 2016 [cited 2021 May 16];4:49-50. Available from: https://www.sjmms.net/text.asp?2016/4/1/49/170915

A 4-year-old boy was presented who fell from a height of about a meter; 3 weeks prior to the presentation. He suffered no loss of consciousness and was active. For about a week prior to the presentation, he was feeling unwell and noted by the family to be less active and complained of occasional abdominal pain. On the day of presentation, while febrile and lying on the couch, he sled and fell on his head. He was brought by his family to the emergency room, conscious but somewhat lethargic and febrile. There was a small bruise over his left eye. The neurological examination was nonfocal.

He was admitted for observation and further investigation. His initial noncontrast enhanced computed tomography (NECT) of the head is shown in [Figure 1].

Figure 1: What are the findings?

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  Questions Top


  1. What are your imaging findings?
  2. What is the most likely diagnosis?
  3. What is your recommendation?




Click here to view answer. View Answer

  Conclusion Top


Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor among the pediatric patients, and orbital metastatic disease is not uncommon in these children. Physical signs as a consequence of orbital metastases such as proptosis and periorbital ecchymosis, frequently are encountered and should raise concern in any pediatric patient with imaging appearances which is suggestive of epidural mass. [1],[2]

 
  References Top

1.
Ahmed S, Goel S, Khandwala M, Agrawal A, Chang B, Simmons IG. Neuroblastoma with orbital metastasis: ophthalmic presentation and role of ophthalmologists. Eye (Lond) 2006;20:466-70.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Brodeur GM, Seeger RC, Barrett A, Berthold F, Castleberry RP, D'Angio G, et al. International criteria for diagnosis, staging, and response to treatment in patients with neuroblastoma. J Clin Oncol 1988;6:1874-81.  Back to cited text no. 2
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3]



 

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