Home Print this page Email this page Users Online: 377
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 15-18

Acute back pain: A survey of primary health care physicians' awareness and knowledge of "red flag" signs


1 Department of Orthopedics, King Khalid University Hospital; Department of Orthopedics, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Orthopedics, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Orthopedics, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Khalid A Alsaleh
P. O. Box 7805, Riyadh 11472
Saudi Arabia
Login to access the Email id

DOI: 10.4103/1658-631X.170882

PMID: 30787689

Rights and Permissions

Background: The failure to detect "red flag" signs in patients presenting with acute low back pain can adversely affect the outcome of management. This can seriously affect the quality of life and productivity of the patient. Objective: The present questionnaire-based study was performed to assess the knowledge and awareness of red flag signs among primary health care physicians managing patients with acute back pain in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: The study sample size was comprised of 80 subjects. The level of knowledge was assessed by means of a new structured self-administered questionnaire. The design of this questionnaire was based on the Agency for Health Care Research and Policy (AHCRP) guidelines for detection of red flag signs. Physicians were asked about red flag signs that indicate the presence of tumor, infection, spinal fracture, or cauda equina syndrome. Results: Sixty-eight (85% of total) physicians were aware of red flag signs. Of the 68 physicians who were aware of the red flag signs, 58 (72%) were aware of neurological deficit, 36 (45% of total) were aware of extremes of age (<10 years and >50 years), and 33 (41% of total) were aware of and routinely inquired about the history of spinal trauma, whereas only 24 (30% of total) were aware of and inquired about constitutional symptoms in their patients with acute back pain. Conclusion: Although low back pain is extremely common, knowledge and awareness of red flag signs of primary health care physicians managing patients with acute back pain in Riyadh appear to be inadequate. This indicates a lack of adherence to the international guidelines. Specific educational programs should target these deficiencies and increase awareness.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2853    
    Printed58    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded385    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal